4.26.2010

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban



This past weekend I finished Book 3, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. I give it points above the first two for leaving out Voldemort for once. 7 encounters with Voldemort in 7 years means 7 times the brute has regained power and 7 times failed... not only redundant but sounds as if we have a few inept wizards in our midst (both good and bad). Now, I can't recall if Voldemort appears in both 5 & 6 but 6/7 says theratio is a little too high and new plot devices should really be invented. So far Book 3 is the highest in rank for my Harry Potter reading adventures.


I haven't kept up will all of the movies but I watched Book 3's corresponding film this weekend. It's...cheesy. Are they all so cheesy? Breathtaking countryside, expensive clothing (have you ever seen so many minors in such high end clothing? I mean, Hermione is the new Burberry model...), and Lupin and Dumbledoor taking Harry on lengthy walks through the outdoors sharing their wisdom...


I don't know, it's not really my cup of tea. I really enjoyed it when I was younger and I think it works well for a young audience; however, I take issue with it now because I very much feel like Harry Potter is not for young readers and does not have an audience mostly comprised of youngsters and their parents. Harry Potter has come to be fully embraced by the general public. Countless adults list Harry Potter as their favorite book(s) (go look at your Facebook friend pages, you'll be shocked at how many people list Harry Potter). Is this because the general public does not read literature after high school graduation? I don't even think that statement deserves much merit because I'm a lover of children's/young adult literature! I do, I love and have taken multiple classes on each. I think it can be profound, moving, empowering... Is there something I am missing in my revisitation to this text?

I'm not hating on you if you like it. If you like it I think that's wonderful! I mean, I still stand by my earlier statement that I think the uncanny way it got people you, old, and across cultures reading with hunger and frenzy and investment is incredible.

I'd like to hear the why's ...

It's fun. It has that element working for it. I called Cash a "filthy mud-blood" in reference to his mix breed, assigned points to Gyffindor when someone said something clever at dance rehearsal, and told Darling I wanted a house-elf to do our work for us... So maybe it's just fun...




I'm going to take a bit of a Potter break and get caught up with other reading for a while but it's not the end for Potter and myself.





*Today should be our last day at the old apartment (if not today then tomorrow) w00t!

3 comments:

Ann-Michelle said...

I never read past book 3. It never really caught on for me, which surprised me, even at the time. I read SO MUCH fantasy, and HP seemed to be faking it. I liked the films after they got a new director and a new Dumbledore, #4 I think. Good choices, both. The films become more dark/gothic, and scarier, really.

My children's lit professor asked us if we thought HP was going to become iconic children's literature that parents would pass on to their children for generations. I said no, because its not literary genius. But others in the class said yes, because it is so widely loved by a general audience. Now I say whatever gets third grade boys to read 400 pages is a winner.

Ann-Michelle said...

Will you make Hannah a mix tape? can you make mixes on itunes, and then I could buy it?

MaryPosa said...

So, I just posted a summer reading list on my blog, and Ann-Michelle sent me here. Your insights are quite delightful, and I will probably drop by again soon. :)