10.27.2010

The Tipping Point

As defined by Malcom Gladwell, "the moment of critical mass, the threshold, the boiling point."


Photo: Lars Botten via nikolinelr


Maybe it's time to read a little more Gladwell, eh?




So I'm not there yet
(the tipping point)
but I can feel it lurking nearby.




So what does it mean, really, in consequence, to grow up and start making decisions?
Some of the big ones that dictate where you live and what you do with your life every single day.




What does it mean to dream,
 dream big,
and dream with intention?




How do you come to the point where you can articulate what it is you want?
(Is it a personal problem of mine?)




In the unstable economy that has circumstantially landed upon my generation, do  we alter/adjust this dream out of necessity?
Do we dream smart, or safe?
And what are the consequences of dreaming safely,
or balls out? 
Is it worth sacrificing your dream, or your love of something for a shot at success?




What is worth sacrificing for happiness, for money?
And I don't ask that rhetorically or profoundly, but actually.
What is worth sacrificing for happiness, for money? 
(Because I tell you this one thing, my passions and interests have led me to dreams that are all within fields in which it is very difficult to also be monetarily comfortable. )




I do know that step 1 for me is articulation.
It will take me some time, no doubt. 
But ideas are brewing, emotions are stirred 
and I'm finding the motivation to start making things happen.
It's an active choice.






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Any: advice, empathy, sympathy, ideas, encouragement, stories to share?
What and how and when and where do you dream?
And when do you decide to really do something about it?







6 comments:

BriannEm said...

I have sacrificed for happiness. Part of that used to be being bohemian and care free, moving at a moment's notice.
Now it is having a roof over my head and someone to share a pillow with at the end of the day.
I'm lucky to have my dream.

Ann-Michelle said...

Taking risks and fighting for what I want and what I know will make me happy has always paid off.

Rachel Swan said...

I'll never forget this advice given to me by my father in law:

"Don't try to make money doing something you love. After a while even that turns into a 'job'."

It's not exactly the "do whatever your heart sings + settle for nothing but happiness + rainbows + dreams come true" but it still feels like truth to me. I am a creative person, and I EASILY buy into everything my heart tells me to do. And, of course, I want to do it now. All of it.

I truly believe in doing what I love + doing it every single day. BUT I also believe in doing something that grounds me + keeps me connected to the world + the people around me. Does that mean sacrificing dreams/happiness/following my heart? Of course. I truly believe that some things are more important than happiness. Do I believe in being miserable day after day after day? Of course not. But when we have responsibilities, obligations, and futures to build, sometimes we just have to suck it up and get to work - sacrifice immediate happiness + gratification for the bigger picture, the more rounded + REAL life(is this a complete 'mormon' view? struggle now for the promise of blessings/eternal happiness in the next life? yes?).

As for your happiness/money question? I think that it's incredibly difficult to be happy when you're wondering where your next meal is coming from, or if you can pay the rent.

On the other hand, I am yoga teacher + get paid to do what I love. However, I would do what I do without the pay check. I also have a husband who has a decent job + can support our family and that gives me the freedom to think about + do the things I love.

I like this topic, pretty lady. I say make risks + dream big, but be willing to work hard, sacrifice, and maybe even hold off until you can better realize what it is you really want.

Sherry said...

I think of happiness in terms of satisfaction. Doing whatever I want doesn't satisfy me. I enjoy it, but it lacks the meat of happiness.
I have to be creating something to be satisfied. I need to know I've done something and be able to see that outcome. So I write.
But if circumstances were different (no children) that would have meant PhD Sociology. I'm glad for the change, though I still love Sociology, but I've found a satisfaction beyond anything I expected and it's working out for me.
What do you NEED to be satisfied. To breath and say, "yes, I did it."

Nathan said...

I'm in the same boat missy. I've been thinking about these questions so much that I can't sleep anymore. I think what you wrote is poetry. It was beautiful to read. If articulation is what you're looking for, I think you've got a great start. Just sayin'

Nathan said...

I'm in the same boat missy. I've been thinking about these questions so much that I can't sleep anymore. I think what you wrote is poetry. It was beautiful to read. If articulation is what you're looking for, I think you've got a great start. Just sayin'